For my students and all interested in science news.

 

amolecularmatter:

Researchers have discovered a novel type of communication between bacteria mediated by “bacterial nanotubes" that bridge over to neighbouring cells, providing an ideal platform for the exchange of cellular molecules and signals within and between species. In the image above, Bacillus subtilis is pictured visualised by a high-resolution electron microscope after growth to mid-exponential phase; intercellular nanopores connecting neighboring cells are easily visible.
Image Source: The Cell Picture Show.

amolecularmatter:

Researchers have discovered a novel type of communication between bacteria mediated by “bacterial nanotubes" that bridge over to neighbouring cells, providing an ideal platform for the exchange of cellular molecules and signals within and between species. In the image above, Bacillus subtilis is pictured visualised by a high-resolution electron microscope after growth to mid-exponential phase; intercellular nanopores connecting neighboring cells are easily visible.

Image Source: The Cell Picture Show.

discoverynews:

Schizophrenia Is Actually Eight Genetic Disorders
New research published in the American Journal of Psychiatrysuggests that schizophrenia is not a single disease, but rather a group of eight genetically distinct disorders, each of them with its own set of symptoms. The finding could result in improved diagnosis and treatment, while also shedding light on how genes work together to cause complex disorders.

discoverynews:

Schizophrenia Is Actually Eight Genetic Disorders

New research published in the American Journal of Psychiatrysuggests that schizophrenia is not a single disease, but rather a group of eight genetically distinct disorders, each of them with its own set of symptoms. The finding could result in improved diagnosis and treatment, while also shedding light on how genes work together to cause complex disorders.

ucresearch:

asapscience:

Ever wonder how social media and the internet are affecting your brain? You may never be the same!

ucresearch:

The blood falls of Antarctica

In some remote regions of the antarctic there are glaciers that appear to be bleeding.  This makes for a stunning visual on the bright white snow, but what is going on here?  

The falls are actually the product of a subglacial lake that is seeping out from a rupture in the glacier.  The red color comes from the microbes living in the dark cold lake that use iron to produce energy (think rust).  Scientists think that this population of organisms have been able to evolve separately from the rest of the world for over 1.5 million years.

UC Santa Cruz glaciologist Slawek Tulaczyk studies these types of environments and says they’re great for theorizing life on other planets:

A place like this would be as close of an analog as we can find on this planet for subpermafrost life habitats on Mars.

Tulaczyk and his team drill into Antarctic ice in the hopes of finding these types of ecosystems deep below the surface.  

Read more about Blood Falls here

nationalaquarium:

TODAY AT 3PM EST: Scientists from research vessels the Okeanos Explorer and Nautilus Live will discuss what it’s like to explore our underwater world and share some of their most exciting discoveries! 
To submit questions & get details on how to tune in, click here!

nationalaquarium:

TODAY AT 3PM EST: Scientists from research vessels the Okeanos Explorer and Nautilus Live will discuss what it’s like to explore our underwater world and share some of their most exciting discoveries! 

To submit questions & get details on how to tune in, click here!

txchnologist:

NASA Tests 3-D Printed Engine Components

3-D printing isn’t just for toys and plastic models of your head. Witness a hot fire of NASA’s newest design for rocket engine injectors, 3-D printed to up performance in a way that traditional manufacturing of the parts couldn’t attain.

The agency, which tested the experimental injectors last month at Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., used a type of 3-D printing called direct laser melting. To make the parts, a machine fires a laser at metal powder under the direction of a computer design program. This deposits layers of the metal one on top of the other until the part is complete.

NASA says the technique is letting engineers build the injector out of just two parts instead of the 163 formerly needed using traditional manufacturing methods.

Read More

ucresearch:

The mysterious sailing stones at Racetrack Playa

How does a big heavy rock move on its own across the desert?  The reason is partially due to ice. Researchers have investigated this question since the 1940s, but no one has seen the process in action — until now.

Because the stones can sit for a decade or more without moving, the UC San Diego researchers did not originally expect to see motion in person. Instead, they decided to monitor the rocks remotely by installing a high-resolution weather station capable of measuring gusts to one-second intervals and fitting 15 rocks with custom-built, motion-activated GPS units. 

The experiment was set up in winter 2011 with permission of the Park Service. Then — in what they called “the most boring experiment ever” — the team waited for something to happen.

But in December 2013, Norris and co-author and cousin Jim Norris arrived in Death Valley to discover that the playa was covered with a pond of water seven centimeters (three inches) deep. Shortly after, the rocks began moving.

Their observations show that moving the rocks requires a rare combination of events. First, the playa fills with water, which must be deep enough to form floating ice during cold winter nights but shallow enough to expose the rocks. As nighttime temperatures plummet, the pond freezes to form thin sheets of “windowpane” ice, which must be thin enough to move freely but thick enough to maintain strength. On sunny days, the ice begins to melt and break up into large floating panels, which light winds drive across the playa, pushing rocks in front of them and leaving trails in the soft mud below the surface.

Read more about the discovery here 

pubhealth:

First Vaccine for Dengue Fever Shows Promise in 2nd Big Trial
By Andrew Pollack
An experimental vaccine against dengue fever being developed by Sanofi proved about 60 percent effective in its second large clinical trial. The results could clear the way for the introduction of the world’s first inoculation against the disease, which is mosquito-borne and becoming an increasing threat.
Sanofi, a French drug company, said on Wednesday that use of the vaccine cut the risk of getting dengue by 60.8 percent in the trial, which involved 20,875 children ages 9 to 16 from several countries in Latin America and the Caribbean.
Those who received the vaccine also had an 80.3 percent lower risk of being hospitalized for dengue compared with children who received injections of a placebo.
The results are roughly similar to those from the first large clinical trial, in which the vaccine reduced the incidence of dengue fever by 56.5 percent. That trial involved about 10,000 children in Southeast Asia.
“For the first time ever, after 20 years of research and industrial commitment, dengue is set to become a vaccine-preventable disease,” Olivier Charmeil, chief executive of Sanofi Pasteur, the vaccine division of Sanofi, said in a statement.
(More from The New York Times)

pubhealth:

First Vaccine for Dengue Fever Shows Promise in 2nd Big Trial

By Andrew Pollack

An experimental vaccine against dengue fever being developed by Sanofi proved about 60 percent effective in its second large clinical trial. The results could clear the way for the introduction of the world’s first inoculation against the disease, which is mosquito-borne and becoming an increasing threat.

Sanofi, a French drug company, said on Wednesday that use of the vaccine cut the risk of getting dengue by 60.8 percent in the trial, which involved 20,875 children ages 9 to 16 from several countries in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Those who received the vaccine also had an 80.3 percent lower risk of being hospitalized for dengue compared with children who received injections of a placebo.

The results are roughly similar to those from the first large clinical trial, in which the vaccine reduced the incidence of dengue fever by 56.5 percent. That trial involved about 10,000 children in Southeast Asia.

“For the first time ever, after 20 years of research and industrial commitment, dengue is set to become a vaccine-preventable disease,” Olivier Charmeil, chief executive of Sanofi Pasteur, the vaccine division of Sanofi, said in a statement.

(More from The New York Times)

utcjonesobservatory:

You Can Now Access All Of Richard Feynmans Physics Lectures For Free: 
 
The lectures of Nobel Prize winning physicist Richard Feynman were legendary. Footage of these lectures does exist, but they are most famously preserved in The Feynman Lectures. The three-volume set may be the most popular collection of physics books ever written, and now you can access it online, in its entirety, for free.
The complete online edition of The Feynman Lectures on Physics has been made available in HTML 5 through a collaboration between Caltech (where Feyman first delivered these talks, in the early 1960s) and The Feynman Lectures Website. The online edition is “high quality up-to-date copy of Feynman’s legendary lectures,” and, thanks to the implementation of scalable vector graphics, “has been designed for ease of reading on devices of any size or shape; text, figures and equations can all be zoomed without degradation.”
Volume I deals mainly with mechanics, radiation and heat; Volume II with electromagnetism and matter; and Volume III with quantum mechanics.
Go. Have fun. 
[The Feynman Lectures on Physics via Open Culture]

utcjonesobservatory:

You Can Now Access All Of Richard Feynmans Physics Lectures For Free:

 

The lectures of Nobel Prize winning physicist Richard Feynman were legendary. Footage of these lectures does exist, but they are most famously preserved in The Feynman Lectures. The three-volume set may be the most popular collection of physics books ever written, and now you can access it online, in its entirety, for free.

The complete online edition of The Feynman Lectures on Physics has been made available in HTML 5 through a collaboration between Caltech (where Feyman first delivered these talks, in the early 1960s) and The Feynman Lectures Website. The online edition is “high quality up-to-date copy of Feynman’s legendary lectures,” and, thanks to the implementation of scalable vector graphics, “has been designed for ease of reading on devices of any size or shape; text, figures and equations can all be zoomed without degradation.”

Volume I deals mainly with mechanics, radiation and heat; Volume II with electromagnetism and matter; and Volume III with quantum mechanics.

Go. Have fun.

[The Feynman Lectures on Physics via Open Culture]

futurescope:

Recycling old batteries into solar cells

A system proposed by researchers at MIT would recycle materials from discarded car batteries — a potential source of lead pollution — into new, long-lasting solar panels that provide emissions-free power.

[read more] [paper]